Speakers

Speakers will provide a variety of perspectives from different academic and professional backgrounds. This page provides information about presenters. For details of presentations and other programming, please visit the Programme page.


  • Marcos Benevides
    Marcos Benevides
    J. F. Oberlin University, Japan
  • Christina Gkonou
    Christina Gkonou
    University of Essex, UK
  • Stephen E. Gregg
    Stephen E. Gregg
    University of Wolverhampton, UK
  • Momoko Nakamura
    Momoko Nakamura
    Kanto Gakuin University, Japan
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Marcos Benevides
J. F. Oberlin University, Japan

Biography

Marcos Benevides is a teacher, researcher, and multiple award-winning author/editor of English language teaching materials. His latest work, a second edition of task-based coursebook Widgets Inc., was recently awarded the 2018 British Council ELTon for Course Innovation. The first edition of Widgets (2008) has been widely credited as the first internationally successful task-based course. His other notable works include Fiction in Action: Whodunit (2011 ELTon and 2010 ESU Award) and the Atama-ii multi-path series (two 2015 and one 2016 Extensive Reading Foundation awards). Marcos is the president of Atama-ii Books and an Assistant Professor and English Language Program Coordinator at J. F. Oberlin University. His research interests include task-based language teaching, particularly course design and assessment, and extensive reading. Marcos lives in Tokyo with his family.

Christina Gkonou
University of Essex, UK

Biography

Dr Christina Gkonou is Associate Professor of TESOL and MA TESOL Programme Leader in the Department of Language and Linguistics at the University of Essex, UK. She is also Deputy Director of Education in the same Department. She convenes postgraduate modules on teacher education and development, and on psychological aspects surrounding the foreign language learning and teaching experience. She is the co-editor of New Directions in Language Learning Psychology (with Sarah Mercer and Dietmar Tatzl) and New Insights into Language Anxiety: Theory, Research and Educational Implications (with Jean-Marc Dewaele and Mark Daubney), and co-author of MYE: Managing Your Emotions Questionnaire (with Rebecca L. Oxford). Her new book, entitled The Emotional Rollercoaster of Language Teaching (co-edited with Jean-Marc Dewaele and Jim King) will be out in June 2020.

Featured Presentation (2020) | The Ups and Downs of Language Learning
Stephen E. Gregg
University of Wolverhampton, UK

Biography

Dr Stephen E. Gregg is Senior Lecturer in Religious Studies at the University of Wolverhampton, and the Hon. Secretary of the British Association for the Study of Religions. His research interests are focused on Religious Identity, Contemporary Religion, Minority Religions, and Religion and Comedy/Performance. His recent books include Swami Vivekananda and Non-Hindu Traditions (Routledge, 2019), The Insider/Outsider Debate: New Approaches in the Study of Religion (Equinox, 2019), The Bloomsbury Handbook to Studying Christians (Bloomsbury, 2019), Engaging with Living Religion (Routledge, 2015) and Jesus Beyond Christianity (Oxford University Press, 2010).

Stephen received his BA and PhD from the University of Wales, where he was subsequently appointed Lecturer in Religious Studies. He was then appointed as Fellow in the Study of Religion at Liverpool Hope University and is now Senior Lecturer at Wolverhampton, the multicultural heart of the UK. He has delivered invited papers at universities in India, Turkey, Australia, the USA, and across the UK and Europe. In 2013 Stephen was the lead coordinator for the European Association for the Study of Religions and the International Association for the History of Religions Conference in Liverpool, UK.

Keynote Presentation (2020) | Embracing Difference: Religious Diversity in the UK
Momoko Nakamura
Kanto Gakuin University, Japan

Biography

Momoko Nakamura, PhD is Professor of English at Kanto Gakuin University, Japan. Her research interest includes linguistic construction of gendered, sexualised identity and historical discursive formation of gendered styles. She is the author of Gender, Language and Ideology: A Genealogy of Japanese Women’s Language (2014, John Benjamins); Honyaku ga tsukuru Nihongo: Hiroin wa onna kotoba o hanashi tsuzukeru [Translation and Japanese: Heroines Speak Women’s Language] (2013, Hakutakusha); Onnakotoba to Nihongo [Women’s Language and Japanese] (2012, Iwanami shoten); Onnakotoba wa tsukurareru [Constructing Women’s Language], which received the 27th Yamakawa Kikue Award, (2007, Hituzi shobo); Sei to Nihongo: Kotoba ga tsukuru onna to otoko [Sex and Japanese: Woman and Man Constructed by Language] (2007, NHK shuppan); Kotoba to jendā [Language and Gender] (2001, Keiso shobo); and Kotoba to feminizumu [Language and Feminism] (1995, Keiso shobo). She has contributed chapters to The Handbook of Language, Gender, and Sexuality (2014); The Political Economy of Affect and Emotion in East Asia (2014; Femininity, Feminism and Gendered Discourse (2010); The Language and Sexuality Reader (2006); and Japanese Language, Gender, and Ideology (2004). She also edited a textbook, Jendā de manabu gengogaku [Learning Linguistics through Gender] (2010) and translated into Japanese Feminism and Linguistic Theory by Deborah Cameron (1990) and Language and Sexuality by Deborah Cameron and Don Kulick (2010).