Programme

Speakers at The Asian Conference on Language (ACL2022) will provide a variety of perspectives from different academic and professional backgrounds. This page provides details of featured presentations, the conference schedule and other programming. For more information about presenters, please visit the Speakers page.


Conference Outline

Friday, March 25, 2022Saturday, March 26, 2022Sunday, March 27, 2022

09:00–12:00: Plenary Session

12:00–13:15: Lunch Break

13:15–14:45: Plenary Session

14:45–15:00: Break

15:00–16:30: Plenary Session

09:00–10:30: Parallel Sessions

10:30–10:45: Break

10:45–12:15: Parallel Sessions

12:15–13:15: Lunch Break

13:15–14:45: Parallel Sessions

14:45–15:00: Break

15:00–16:30: Parallel Sessions

16:30–17:00: Break

17:00–18:00: Parallel Sessions

09:00–10:30: Parallel Sessions

10:30–10:45: Break

10:45–12:15: Parallel Sessions

12:15–13:15: Lunch Break

13:15–14:45: Parallel Sessions

14:45–15:00: Break

15:00–16:30: Parallel Sessions

16:30–17:00: Break

17:00–18:00: Closing Session

The draft version of the Conference Programme will be available online on February 25, 2022. All registered delegates will be notified of this publication by email.

*Please be aware that the above schedule may be subject to change.

Important Information Emails

All registered attendees will receive an Important Information email and updates in the run-up to the conference. Please check your email inbox for something from "iafor.org". If you can not find these emails in your normal inbox, it is worth checking in your spam or junk mail folders as many programs filter out emails this way. If these did end up in one of these folders, please add the address to your acceptable senders' folder by whatever method your email program can do this.


Virtual Presentations


Featured Presentations

  • Reflection and Metacognition in Language Learning: Are We Doing Enough to Support Our Students?
    Reflection and Metacognition in Language Learning: Are We Doing Enough to Support Our Students?
    Plenary Panel: Luke Carson, Åsta Haukås, Li-Shih Huang & Yoshiyuki Nakata
  • Hate Speech, Love Speech, Free Speech?
    Hate Speech, Love Speech, Free Speech?
    Panel Presentation
  • Dreaming of Words (2021)
    Dreaming of Words (2021)
    Film Screening: Nandan

Previous Programming

View details of programming for past ACL conferences via the links below.

Reflection and Metacognition in Language Learning: Are We Doing Enough to Support Our Students?
Plenary Panel: Luke Carson, Åsta Haukås, Li-Shih Huang & Yoshiyuki Nakata

Language educators would generally agree that it is important to engage learners in reflection and help them to develop the awareness and strategies needed for self-regulation. Indeed, we know from the research that reflection leads to the development of metacognition and enhances both the experience and outcomes of language learning (Huang, 2021; Richards & Lockhard, 1996; Schön, 1984). However, in practice, teachers may not necessarily be well equipped to promote reflection on learning for a host of reasons. Some examples include lacking awareness of the field and terminology associated with reflection (Silver, 2013); lacking training in how to adequately promote reflection on learning; and lacking time or opportunities to dedicate to reflection in class due to curriculum constraints. Although some learners are naturally reflective, most students need support in developing an awareness of reflective processes as an integral part of the language curriculum. In addition, learners need support and opportunities to think deeply about their learning beyond the classroom.

This panel has two main aims. Firstly, we approach the subject of reflection from the point of view of language learners. We explore what we mean by reflection and why it is important for language learning. We discuss how we can engage students in reflection on their learning as part of the language acquisition process. Secondly, we approach the subject of reflection from the perspective of language educators. How can we best prepare and support teachers to be able to promote reflection in their learners? What evidence can be gathered to facilitate reflective noticing? What support can be offered in teacher training programs, teacher development programs and at program and institutional levels? Although we have chosen these two perspectives, the influences of the learners and the educators are bidirectional (Hattie & Clark, 2019; Murphey 2021) and both can benefit from feedback and shared dialogue about the learning that is taking place.

We bring together panellists with diverse experiences who can explore both the theoretical and the practical aspects of promoting reflection and developing metacognition in language learners and in supporting teachers in the process.

Read presenter biographies
Hate Speech, Love Speech, Free Speech?
Panel Presentation

In 2021 the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to two journalists, Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov “for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace.” In a context of rising global authoritarianism and autocracy, the award was a reminder of the long and difficult history of journalists holding power to account.

It is little wonder that the ways in which we communicate, whether through the spoken or the written word, are the subject of constant discussion or controversy. Our communication is guided and regulated by myriad de facto and de jure rules and laws, and these change by context and country. What is acceptable or appropriate in one context may not be in another. The same words that make you celebrated, may also make you reviled, and the same words that can make you a reputation, a living and a life, can also take these away.

In this panel, a group of linguists and academics will discuss speech in the global academy to look at the rights and responsibilities associated with expression through language, to include the following: Who has a voice? Who gets the right to say what? Who has agency? Who has representation? Who should shut up and in what circumstances should they? Who has the right to speak for whom? Who gets to set the agenda? What of “culture” wars and “cancel” culture? What of state censorship and self-censorship?

Dreaming of Words (2021)
Film Screening: Nandan

Njattyela Sreedharan, a fourth-standard drop-out, compiles a dictionary connecting four Indian languages. Travelling across four states and doing extensive research, he spent twenty five years making the multilingual dictionary. This unique dictionary offers a comparative study of Malayalam, Kannada, Tamil and Telugu. Dreaming of Words traces Sreedharan's life, work, love for languages and the struggles to get the dictionary published. The film also explores the linguistic and cultural diversity in India.

Read Director's biography
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