Programme (Online)

Speakers at The Asian Conference on Language (ACL2022) will provide a variety of perspectives from different academic and professional backgrounds. This page provides details of featured presentations, the conference schedule and other programming. For more information about presenters, please visit the Speakers page.


Conference Outline

Friday, March 25, 2022 |Saturday, March 26, 2022 |Virtual Presentations

All times are Japan Standard Time (UTC+9)
Use our time converter tool to show times in your timezone.

09:00-09:10: Announcements, Recognition of IAFOR Scholarship Winners, & Welcome Address
Joseph Haldane, IAFOR, Japan

09:15-10:15: Panel Presentation
Reflection and Metacognition in Language Learning: Are We Doing Enough to Support Our Students?
Luke Carson, Hiroshima City University, Japan
Åsta Haukås, University of Bergen, Norway
Li-Shih Huang, University of Victoria, Canada
Yoshiyuki Nakata, Doshisha University, Japan

10:15-10:25: Break

10:25-11:30: Panel Presentation
Hate Speech, Love Speech, Free Speech?
Ben Fenton-Smith, Griffith University, Australia
Neil Thin, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Haruko Satoh, IAFOR Research Centre, OSIPP, Japan (Moderator)

11:30-11:40: Break

11:40-12:40: Critical Discussion Session
Theme: Is the Pen Really Mightier than the Sword?
Dexter Da Silva, Keisen University, Japan
Joseph Haldane, IAFOR, Japan

All times are Japan Standard Time (UTC+9)
Use our time converter tool to show times in your timezone.

10:30-11:20: Live-Stream Presentation Session 1
Room A: Language & Psychology
62188 | The Effect of Imagery Training on Possible Language Selves Among Beginner English Users
62898 | Emancipation in the English Language Classroom: From What, Into What?

Room B: Language Learning and Teaching
62670 | Effects of Different Early Literacy Programs on Chinese Word Recognition Among Taiwanese Kindergarteners
62385 | Effectiveness of Modules in Enhancing Writing Skills: An Enrichment Activities for Secondary Learners

11:20-11:30: Break

11:30-12:45: Live-Stream Presentation Session 2
Room A: Language & Culture
62067 | Appraisal Analysis of Hiroshima A-Bomb Survivors’ Testimonies: Linguistic Insights on the Building of Hiroshima Peace Culture
62255 | Gender Bias in Learning Materials: A Comparative Study Between Mauritanian and Japanese English Textbooks
62863 | Partnering Up for Tertiary-Level Online Intercultural Programs: Building a Framework Towards Implementation

Room B: Language Learning and Teaching
62277 | A Reflection Intervention: Investigating Effectiveness and Students’ Perceptions
62111 | Collaborative Leadership in the Language Classroom: Engaging Learners in Leaderful Classroom Practices and Strategies

12:45-12:55: Break

12:55-14:10: Live-Stream Presentation Session 3
Room A: Language & Linguistics
61876 | The Interpreter – Servant to Meaning or Master of Words?
62275 | The Phonological Variation of Tones: An Acoustic Study of Attitudinal Function in Bangla Clauses
55334 | A Register Analysis of Written Messages from the Papacy and the Universal House of Justice

Room B: Language Learning and Teaching
62213 | Interactive Reflection in Language Learning: Exploring the Potential of Advising Tools in the Classroom
62904 | Virtual Conversation in EFL Classroom: A Manga-based Approach During the Pandemic
62276 | Facilitating Reflection and Reflective Dialogue: Activities in an Introductory Self-Directed Learning Module and Course

14:10-14:20: Break

14:20-15:10: Live-Stream Presentation Session 4
Room A: Language Learning
62273 | Pragmalinguistic Errors on a Cause-and-Effect Relationship in Japanese EFL Learners’ Writing: A Case of the Use of ‘So’
62038 | Early Constructions of the English Dative Alternation: A Corpus-based Study
61320 | Repair Practices in Phone Conversations: A Case Study of L2 English Speakers

Room B: Language and Communication
61112 | Linguistic Analysis of Discourse in International Speeches
62720 | A Case Study of a Queer Learner’s Japanese Language Learning and Gender Identity Construction
62078 | “Sorry for the Long Message”: A Discoursive Approach to Analysing Japanese Apologies in Online Settings

15:35-15:45: Break

15:45-17:00 Film Screening
Dreaming of Words
Nandan, Independent Film Director & Producer, India
Dexter Da Silva, Keisen University, Japan (Moderator)

17:00-17:15: Conference Closing Address
Joseph Haldane, IAFOR, Japan

Virtual Presentations will be available to view from March 18, 2022.

Virtual Poster Presentations

62200 | Qualifying Proficient and Cross-cultural Competent English Teachers in the 21st Century
62993 | Teaching Aviation English in a Japanese College: Utilizing Google Classroom

Pre-Recorded Virtual Presentations

Language Acquisition
62195 | How Do Multilingual Children Feel About Family Language Policy at Home?
62698 | State-of-the-art of CLIL Research Using Bibliometric Approach: 2005-2021
62900 | Professional Peer Review and Value in Academic Writing: Implications for EAP Course Design
62910 | Lexical and Non-lexical Processing Among Arabic-English Speaking Children
Language and Communication
62249 | Dementia Care Users’ Resistance to Long-term Home Care Service: Taiwanese Care Workers’ Advised Communication Strategies

Language and Culture
61718 | Stereotyping Language and Generalizing Language Toward Foreigners Living in Shanghai, An Analysis of the Language Used
61797 | A Corpus-based Approach to the Imagery and Symbolism in Chinese-English Translation of Children’s Literature
62176 | The Hidden Language Classroom: A Case Study of a Chinese Immigrant Mother’s Using Everyday Objects for Heritage Language Maintenance
62515 | Semantic Variations of Arabic Loanwords in Maguindanaon
62874 | Change in Attitudes Toward English by Japanese Learners of English: Through ELF Interactions in a Distance Learning Course With a Taiwanese University
Language and Culture
62899 | Sociocultural Differences in Email-Mediated Communication: An Analysis of Metadiscourse in Chinese and English Request Emails

Language and Psychology
62104 | Language as the Foundation of Dasein

Language and Technology
62205 | Storytelling with Multi-media Technologies

Language Learning and Teaching
61121 | Preparing Future Educators to Support the Language Needs of All Students
62037 | Lessons Learned From Teaching Japanese for Medical Purposes to International Students
62193 | Encouraging Reflection on Speaking Performance in Class: Findings and Suggestions
62241 | L2 WTC and Relatedness in Social Online Classrooms: Findings from a Longitudinal Action Research Project in a Japanese University Classroom
62245 | Shaping Self-awareness, Introspection and Resilience: Why Language Learners Need Training in Reflective Writing
62278 | Self-directed Language Learning: Which Tasks and Tools Are Most Effective for Promoting Reflection on Learning?
62592 | Developing Students’ Academic Writing Identity through Alternative Genres
62619 | English as a Second Language (L2) Functions, Purposes and Didactic Implications: A Grounded Theory on Code-switching Linguistic Phenomenon
62214 | Reflection in Language Learning: An Institutional Integration Project

Linguistics
62510 | Morphological Assimilation of Arabic Loanwords in Maguindanaon

The draft version of the Conference Programme will be available online on February 25, 2022. All registered delegates will be notified of this publication by email.

*Please be aware that the above schedule may be subject to change.

Important Information Emails

All registered attendees will receive an Important Information email and updates in the run-up to the conference. Please check your email inbox for something from "iafor.org". If you can not find these emails in your normal inbox, it is worth checking in your spam or junk mail folders as many programs filter out emails this way. If these did end up in one of these folders, please add the address to your acceptable senders' folder by whatever method your email program can do this.

Final Programme

The online version of the Conference Programme is now available to view below via the Issuu viewing platform. Alternatively, download a PDF version. The Conference Programme can also be viewed on the Issuu website (requires a web browser). An Issuu app is available for Android users.

The Conference Programme contains access information, session information and a detailed day-to-day presentation schedule.

Important Information Emails

All registered attendees will receive an Important Information email and updates in the run-up to the conference. Please check your email inbox for something from "iafor.org". If you can not find these emails in your normal inbox, it is worth checking in your spam or junk mail folders as many programs filter out emails this way. If these did end up in one of these folders, please add the address to your acceptable senders' folder by whatever method your email program can do this.


Virtual Presentations


Featured Presentations

  • Reflection and Metacognition in Language Learning: Are We Doing Enough to Support Our Students?
    Reflection and Metacognition in Language Learning: Are We Doing Enough to Support Our Students?
    Plenary Panel: Luke Carson, Åsta Haukås, Li-Shih Huang & Yoshiyuki Nakata
  • Hate Speech, Love Speech, Free Speech?
    Hate Speech, Love Speech, Free Speech?
    Panel Presentation: Ben Fenton-Smith, Haruko Satoh & Neil Thin
  • Is the Pen Really Mightier than the Sword?
    Is the Pen Really Mightier than the Sword?
    Critical Discussion Session: Dexter Da Silva & Joseph Haldane
  • Dreaming of Words (2021)
    Dreaming of Words (2021)
    Film Screening: Nandan

Previous Programming

View details of programming for past ACL conferences via the links below.

Reflection and Metacognition in Language Learning: Are We Doing Enough to Support Our Students?
Plenary Panel: Luke Carson, Åsta Haukås, Li-Shih Huang & Yoshiyuki Nakata

Language educators would generally agree that it is important to engage learners in reflection and help them to develop the awareness and strategies needed for self-regulation. Indeed, we know from the research that reflection leads to the development of metacognition and enhances both the experience and outcomes of language learning (Huang, 2021; Richards & Lockhard, 1996; Schön, 1984). However, in practice, teachers may not necessarily be well equipped to promote reflection on learning for a host of reasons. Some examples include lacking awareness of the field and terminology associated with reflection (Silver, 2013); lacking training in how to adequately promote reflection on learning; and lacking time or opportunities to dedicate to reflection in class due to curriculum constraints. Although some learners are naturally reflective, most students need support in developing an awareness of reflective processes as an integral part of the language curriculum. In addition, learners need support and opportunities to think deeply about their learning beyond the classroom.

This panel has two main aims. Firstly, we approach the subject of reflection from the point of view of language learners. We explore what we mean by reflection and why it is important for language learning. We discuss how we can engage students in reflection on their learning as part of the language acquisition process. Secondly, we approach the subject of reflection from the perspective of language educators. How can we best prepare and support teachers to be able to promote reflection in their learners? What evidence can be gathered to facilitate reflective noticing? What support can be offered in teacher training programs, teacher development programs and at program and institutional levels? Although we have chosen these two perspectives, the influences of the learners and the educators are bidirectional (Hattie & Clark, 2019; Murphey 2021) and both can benefit from feedback and shared dialogue about the learning that is taking place.

We bring together panellists with diverse experiences who can explore both the theoretical and the practical aspects of promoting reflection and developing metacognition in language learners and in supporting teachers in the process.

Read presenter biographies
Hate Speech, Love Speech, Free Speech?
Panel Presentation: Ben Fenton-Smith, Haruko Satoh & Neil Thin

In 2021 the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to two journalists, Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov “for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace.” In a context of rising global authoritarianism and autocracy, the award was a reminder of the long and difficult history of journalists holding power to account.

It is little wonder that the ways in which we communicate, whether through the spoken or the written word, are the subject of constant discussion or controversy. Our communication is guided and regulated by myriad de facto and de jure rules and laws, and these change by context and country. What is acceptable or appropriate in one context may not be in another. The same words that make you celebrated, may also make you reviled, and the same words that can make you a reputation, a living and a life, can also take these away.

In this panel, a group of linguists and academics will discuss speech in the global academy to look at the rights and responsibilities associated with expression through language, to include the following: Who has a voice? Who gets the right to say what? Who has agency? Who has representation? Who should shut up and in what circumstances should they? Who has the right to speak for whom? Who gets to set the agenda? What of “culture” wars and “cancel” culture? What of state censorship and self-censorship?

Read presenter biographies
Is the Pen Really Mightier than the Sword?
Critical Discussion Session: Dexter Da Silva & Joseph Haldane

As inter-disciplinary language researchers and educators, of course we would like to answer affirmatively and immediately. But often it’s difficult to do so confidently. Especially during times like the current one, with propaganda, fake news, misinformation, and conspiracy theories reigning supreme. Social media exacerbates the problem with language – especially the written word – taken up by uncritical readers in dangerously negative ways. What is needed for ‘the pen’, the written word, to really be mightier than violence directed against others?

This critical discussion will start with a brief introduction about the power of human language, and what needs to happen in order for humanity to positively face the challenges of the ‘new normal’, post-pandemic, anthropocene future.

Read presenter biographies
Dreaming of Words (2021)
Film Screening: Nandan

Njattyela Sreedharan, a fourth-standard drop-out, compiles a dictionary connecting four Indian languages. Travelling across four states and doing extensive research, he spent twenty five years making the multilingual dictionary. This unique dictionary offers a comparative study of Malayalam, Kannada, Tamil and Telugu. Dreaming of Words traces Sreedharan's life, work, love for languages and the struggles to get the dictionary published. The film also explores the linguistic and cultural diversity in India.

Read Director's biography
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